The Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Credit 1-5 Year Index: The Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Credit 1-5 Year Index is a market value weighted performance benchmark which includes virtually every major investment-grade rated corporate bond with 1-5 years remaining until maturity that serves as a supplementary benchmark.

The Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Intermediate Government/Credit 1-10 Year Index: The Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Intermediate Government/Credit 1-10 Year Index is an index of all investment grade bonds with maturities of more than one year and less than 10 years. The Barclays U.S. Intermediate Government/Credit 1-10 Year Index is a market value weighted performance benchmark.

The Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Government/Credit 1-5 Year Index: The Bloomberg Barclays U.S. Government/Credit 1-5 Year Index is an index of all investment grade bonds with maturities of more than one year and less than 5 years. The Barclays U.S. Government/Credit 1-5 Year Index is a market value weighted performance benchmark.

Basis Points: A unit that is equal to 1/100th of 1%, and is used to denote the change in a financial instrument. The basis point is commonly used for calculating changes in interest rates, equity indexes and the yield of a fixed-income security.

Beta: A measure of the volatility, or systematic risk, of a security or a portfolio in comparison to the market as a whole.

Book Value:The net asset value of a company, calculated by total assets minus intangible assets (patents, goodwill) and liabilities.

Capital Expenditures (capex):Capital expenditures are expenditures altering the future of the business. A capital expenditure is incurred when a business spends money either to buy fixed assets or to add to the value of an existing fixed asset with a useful life extending beyond the taxable year.

Cash Flow: A measure of the cash generating capability of a company by adding non-cash charges (e.g. depreciation) and interest expense to pretax income.

Correlation: A statistical measure of how two securities move in relation to each other.

Coupon Yield: The interest rate on a bond, determined upon issuance, and expressed as a percentage of par value.

Credit Ratings: Ratings are provided by Standard & Poor’s, who assign a rating based on their analysis of the issuer’s credit worthiness. The highest rating given is AAA and the lowest is C.

Dividend Yield: : A financial ratio that indicates how much a company pays out in dividends each year relative to its share price.

Duration: A commonly used measure of the potential volatility of the price of a debt security, or the aggregate market value of a portfolio of debt securities, prior to maturity. Securities with a longer duration generally have more volatile prices than securities of comparable quality with a shorter duration.

Earnings Growth: A measure of growth in a company's net income over a specific period of time, usually one to five years.

Enterprise Multiple (EV/EBITDA): A ratio used to determine the value of a company which looks at a firm as a potential acquirer would, taking into account the company's debt, which other multiples like the price-to-earnings (P/E) ratio do not include.

Forward P/E: Price/earnings ratio, using earnings estimates for the next four quarters.

Forward Earnings: A company's forecasted, or estimated, earnings made by analysts or by the company itself.

Free Cash Flow: Measure of financial performance calculated as operating cash flow minus capital expenditures. Free cash flow (FCF) represents the cash that a company is able to generate after laying out the money required to maintain or expand its asset base.

Market Cap: The market price of an entire company, calculated by multiplying the number of shares outstanding by the price per share.

NASDAQ: A computerized system that facilitates trading and provides price quotations on more than 5,000 of the more actively traded over the counter stocks. Created in 1971, the Nasdaq was the world's first electronic stock market.

Par Value: The face value of a bond.

Price Momentum: The rate of acceleration of a security's price or volume.

Price-To-Book (P/B) Ratio: A ratio used to compare a stock's market value to its book value. It is calculated by dividing the current closing price of the stock by the latest quarter's book value per share.

Price-To-Earnings (P/E) Ratio: A valuation ratio of a company's current share price compared to its per-share earnings. Divide market value of a share by the earnings per share.

Price/Networking Ratio: A measure of both a company's efficiency and its short-term financial health.

Price/Sales Ratio: A ratio for valuing a stock relative to its own past performance, other companies or the market itself. Price to sales is calculated by dividing a stock's current price by its revenue per share for the trailing 12 months.

Return On Capital (ROC): In economics, return on capital, also known as return on invested capital, is a financial measure that quantifies how well a company generates cash flow relative to the capital it has invested in its business.

Return On Equity (ROE): The amount of a company’s net income returned as a percentage of shareholders equity.

Return On Invested Capital (ROIC): A calculation used to assess a company's efficiency at allocating the capital under its control to profitable investments

Russell 1000: An index measuring the performance of the 1,000 smallest companies in the Russell 3000 Index, which is made up of 3,000 of the biggest U.S. stocks. The Russell 2000 serves as a benchmark for small cap stocks in the United States.

Russell 2000: An index measuring the performance of the 2,000 smallest companies in the Russell 3000 Index, which is made up of 3,000 of the biggest U.S. stocks. The Russell 2000 serves as a benchmark for small cap stocks in the United States.

Russell 3000: An index made up of the 3,000 largest U.S.-traded stocks.

Russell Midcap Index: The Russell Midcap Index measures the performance of the 800 smallest companies in the Russell 1000 Index based on total market capitalization. You cannot invest directly in an index.

Russell Top 200 Index: The Russell Top 200 Index measures the performance of the largest cap segment of the U.S. equity universe.

S&P 500: The S&P 500 Index is an unmanaged index commonly used to measure the performance of U.S. stocks. You cannot directly invest in an index.

SEC Yield: A standardized yield computed by dividing the net investment income per share earned during the 30-day period prior to quarter-end and was created to allow for fairer comparisons among bond funds.

Spread: The percentage point difference between yields of various classes of bonds compared to treasury bonds.

Weighted Average Market Cap: the average market capitalization of all companies in a fund - with each company weighted according to its percent held in the fund.

Yield: The income earned from a bond, which takes into account the sum of the interest payment, the redemption value at the bond’s maturity, and the initial purchase price of the bond.

Yield Curve: A line that plots the interest rates, at a set point in time, of bonds having equal credit quality but differing maturity dates.

Yield-to-Maturity: The rate of return anticipated on a bond if it is held until the maturity date, which takes into account the current market price, par value, coupon interest rate and time to maturity.

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